UK Plastic Surgery Statistics – the Good Times are back

Not only is the UK economy is recovering, but plastic surgery is at an all-time high with solid 16% growth following modest growth in the last 2 years. More than 50,000 cosmetic surgery procedures were performed in the UK last year, according to the British Association of Aesthetic Plastic Surgeons, with liposuction recording a 41% rise.

The numbers highlight an impressive double-digit rise in all cosmetic procedures. Breast augmentation (over 11,000) remained the most popular procedure overall. But the biggest increase on the year was for liposuction. A total of 4,326 liposuction procedures were performed last year – an increase of 41% on the year. It was the sixth most popular procedure among women and the fourth most popular among men. In the UK, women accounted for 90.5% of all cosmetic procedures in 2013 with a total of 45,365 procedures.

Rhinoplasty was the most popular with 1,037 surgical procedures carried out last year for men. Eyelid ops were the second most popular procedure for men in 2013, followed by breast reduction. Liposuction procedures saw the biggest rise with a 28% increase on 2012. 554 men opted for liposuction last year according to the data.

Check out our previous post on US Plastic Surgery.

Click the image to interact


Click

British Gas’ winter price hike faces an ice cold storm of sarcasm

Shortly after announcing a price hike last week, British Gas invited the public to tweet their Customer Service Director with the hashtag “#AskBG”. Unfortunately for BG, as the BBC put it, this Q&A “didn’t go to plan”.

For the 35 tweets it sent, British gas got 14,000 responses in the space of a few hours, and, as our social media probe picked up, sarcasm was de rigueur. The most retweeted comment was “Dear British Gas, is it cheaper for one to burn £20 notes than put the heating on this Winter? #AskBG” which was retweeted 922 times. Yet, maybe because BG decided to quit after 35 tweets, the storm was short lived, and the conversation died out within hours.

Good move or wrong use of social media? To decide, check out the dashboard below. Click on “details” to read the tweets themselves and on “words” for a heatmap of the vocabulary used throughout the conversation.

Click the image to interact


Click